Math


 

Mathematics I  •  Year

Darrow's Math sequence begins with this course, taught non-traditionally. Topics include number sense, linear, absolute-value, quadratic and radical functions, as well as complex and imaginary numbers. This is the first year of an integrated, student-centered, and problem-based four-year Math program. In class, students utilize the Harkness method by presenting their solutions to problems and, with the teacher’s facilitation, identify key concepts and surprising connections between mathematical ideas as they emerge. This course is best suited for those students who have completed a traditional Algebra I course or its equivalent.

 

Mathematics II  •  Year

Math II covers a variety of topics that are included in traditional Geometry and Algebra II classes, as well as some Pre-Calculus material, such as vectors and parametric equations. This course is taken during the second year of Darrow’s integrated, student-centered, and problem-based four-year Math program. In class, students utilize the Harkness method by presenting their solutions to problems and, with the teacher’s facilitation, identify key concepts and surprising connections between mathematical ideas as they emerge. if a student enters Math II from outside the Darrow Math sequence, the course is best suited for those students who have completed a traditional Geometry course or its equivalent.  For all 10th graders

 

Math III  •  Year

Math III covers a variety of topics that are included in traditional Algebra II and Pre-Calculus classes, as well as some introductory Calculus material, such as limits and series. This course is taken during the third year of Darrow’s integrated, student-centered, and problem-based four-year Math program. In class, students utilize the Harkness method by presenting their solutions to problems and, with the teacher’s facilitation, identify key concepts and surprising connections between mathematical ideas as they emerge. If a student enters Math III from outside the Darrow Math sequences, the course is best suited for those students who have completed two full years of high school Math. Students who successfully complete Math III are ready to take Calculus as their next Math class if they choose.

 

Pre-Calculus  •  Year

Pre-Calculus is an in-depth study of functions and ways in which they can be manipulated.  Course topics include, but are not limited to, combinations and composition of functions, graphing transformations, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, rational functions, conic sections and an introduction to limits.  Pre-Calculus prepares students for Calculus by providing them with greater understanding of fundamental concepts of Algebra. 

Prerequisite: Algebra II

 

Calculus  •  Year

Calculus is an advanced mathematics topic that requires abstract thought. Topics include limits, derivatives, integrals, and the applications of these topics. 

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or permission of Math Department Chair.

 

Advanced Calculus  •  Year

Advanced Calculus students will continue where they left of in Calculus, beginning with conics, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. They will then continue on to an in-depth study of vectors and vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and differential equations if time permits. Prerequisites: Calculus.

 

Statistics  •  Fall

Statistics is the mathematical science of collecting, describing, and analyzing data from the real world. The first half of the semester is devoted to descriptive statistics, which includes topics such as measurements of central tendency and dispersion, normal distribution, random sampling, coefficient of correlation, an introduction to linear regression, and discussions of causation vs. causality. The second half of the semester focuses on inferential statistics, which are used to test hypotheses and make generalizations about the strength of the data sample. Students will analyze and discuss current events in the media that rely on statistical information for their central message, and gain an understanding of how to both consume and present statistical information.

 

Probability  •  Spring

This is a one-semester course which must be taken in conjunction with Statistics. In Probability, students will learn about questions such as: What is the probability of winning the lottery? What is the probability that my child will have blue eyes? and What is the probability of a sports team winning if it goes into overtime? Together the class will discover the answers to these questions, as well as more that involve combinations, permutations, expected value, and how they relate to various other topics in mathematics.


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